Kollyva and homebrewing

Back in January, I tried homebrewing for the first time. It went well; “Presentation Pale Ale,” named for its bottling date (2 February), was a hit.

I’m doing it again. This time around, if I keep naming it based on when I bottle it, it will be “Paschal Pale”. Should be enjoying it on or around 24 May. I’ll start another batch when I get home from Greece, in time for Oktoberfest.

When I was boiling the grain this time, I wondered — could I make kollyva from it, rather than just throwing it out? I tried one or two of the boiled grains when it was done, and it seemed edible enough.

Any Orthodox homebrewers out there ever tried this? Any homebrewers in general ever figured out something to do with the boiled grain rather than just throwing it out?

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3 Responses to “Kollyva and homebrewing”


  1. 1 Matt 8 April 2009 at 12:18 am

    Never tried this, but an interesting thought. Some brewers make bread from it. Although, if you are doing all-grain brewing this is a lot of spent grain and the bread recipes I have seen call for only a small fraction of the available grain mass (all-grain uses 10+ lbs of grain per batch). If your doing a more intermediate brew with a combination of malt extract and grain, this may be reasonable. I would imagine the grain could make very passable kollyva. Myself and most all-grain brewers I know usually compost the spend grains (they are quite compostable). But this is very interesting. Please let me know the results of any experiments!

  2. 2 outdoorgrrl 8 April 2009 at 9:30 am

    Matt’s right. You only need a small amount of spent grain for bread. Toast it in your oven to dry it out. Grind it up in a food processor and add about 1/2 to 3/4 cup to your next homemade bread. Gives it kind of a nutty flavor. This actually works a bit better if you’re making a dark beer and have leftover grains that were steeping in the wort. Good luck!

  3. 3 Yaakov 25 April 2013 at 9:36 am

    Just a side comment, but you shouldn’t be boiling your grain. You should be boiling your extract. You probably know this, but just in case…


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