Advertisements



“There stands the modern Greek”

This is heartbreaking to read, but I hesitate to accept it uncritically. Assuming I have any readership made up of people who have been to Greece, can anybody comment?

st-nektarios.jpg

When duty and virtue have become antiquated terms that one only finds in books no one reads, we have a declining society entangled in the most petty and ephemeral affairs. Unburdened by the past, unimpeded from posterity, there stands the modern Greek: a person free of any civic and moral duties. The coming of the welfare state brought the monetarization of civic responsibilities and gradually degraded them to special interest sloganeering.

Unlike any other foe the Greeks faced in the past, the one that they face now has no armies laying siege to any walls. There are no occupiers trying to impose their customs and language, no military junta to imprison, torture or banish anyone. It is a foe that does not challenge their strengths but rather assuages their weaknesses. Instead of attacking the culture, it merely trivializes it by draining it of any transcendent qualities. There is no need to assail honesty, merit and hard work; they have simply been rendered irrelevant.

Ouch. Ouch, ouch, ouch. (Hat tip: Rod Dreher.)

Advertisements

1 Response to ““There stands the modern Greek””


  1. 1 Anna 29 February 2008 at 9:16 pm

    As a brilliant Greek scientist/publisher/TV program writer once said to me: “Greece is a failed country”.

    I wish I could say something to the extent of “that article is sad but true”, but actually I don’t feel sad at all. .

    If anything, I feel angry after reading that article.
    I am angry at what Greeks have done to Greece.
    I am angry that Greeks have one of the most corrupt governments in the world.
    I am angry that students don’t realize how they are getting the shaft in their education, and then riot when someone tries bring about (good) changes.
    I am angry at the layers upon layers of red tape in the public sector; all the bureaucracy that you have to deal with in every day life.
    I am angry that Athens is buried in pollution.
    I am angry that Greeks have already forgotten about the forest fires that burnt down 10% of Greek forests last summer.
    I am angry that no one gives a crap about anyone outside of their immediate circle of friends and family.
    I am angry that Che and Castro are held up as shining examples of political revolutionaries.
    I am angry that Greeks have abandoned their Orthodox Faith.
    I am angry that in a couple generations there will be no more Greeks, since no one is having children.
    I am angry that the news on TV is 90 minutes of tabloid entertainment and no substance.
    I am angry when Greeks blame America for all their problems.
    I am angry when Greeks tell me that “this is Greece, you have no right to speak English here”.
    I am angry that anyone with an accent is mocked and treated as second-class citizen.

    I suppose it is facetious of me to say that I am not sad, only angry. For when I think about our heritage that came from the ancient Greeks and Byzantines; when I think about our revolutionary war and our resistance to the Italians and Nazis in WWII; when I think about the soulful music that Greeks produce; when I think about the glorious coastline and seas; when I think about our Orthodox Faith; when I think about the fun-loving, big-hearted spirit of Greeks, I get sad. Because all that is not enough to compensate for the destruction going on today.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Advertisements

Richard’s Twitter

adventures in writing alexander lingas all saints bloomington all saints orthodox church american orthodox architecture american orthodox music american orthodoxy Antiochian Archdiocese Antiochian Orthodox Christian Archdiocese of North America Antiochians books byzantine chant cappella romana chant church architecture ecclesiastical chant ethnomusicologists ethnomusicology fellowship of ss. alban and sergius Greece Greek greek food greekness hazards of church music international travel tips ioannis arvanitis joe mckamey john michael boyer kurt sander Latin liturgical adventures liturgical architecture liturgical music liturgical texts and translation liturgy liturgy and life lycourgos angelopoulos medieval byzantine chant Metropolitan PHILIP militant americanist orthodoxy modern byzantine architecture modern greek music music as iconography my kids will latin and greek when they're newborns my kids will learn latin and greek when they're newborns orthodox architecture orthodox architecture is bloody expensive Orthodox choir schools Orthodox Ecclesiology orthodox outreach orthodox travel pascha at the singing school Patriarchate of Antioch Patriarch IGNATIUS IV Patriarch of Antioch publishing random acts of chant richard barrett in greece richard toensing rod dreher sacred music st. vlads st john of damascus society Syriac the Bishop MARK fan club the convert dilemma the dark knight The Episcopacy The Episcopate the only good language is a dead language this american church life travel we need more american saints why do we need beautiful music in churches?

Blog Stats

  • 217,022 hits

Flickr Photos


%d bloggers like this: